Master of The Ravels by Nicole Galland- Book review

The March of the sequels hosted by Sue’s Musing continues with The Master of The Ravels by Nicole Galland featuring official and rogue time travel agencies, good and bad witches and a whole lot of Shakespeare.

image of Master of the Ravels

Genre: Time Travel,science fiction

Series: Sequel to the Rise and Fall of DODO

Source: My own

This sequel picks up where the original left off, as Tristan Lyons, Mel Stokes, and their fellow outcasts from the Department of Diachronic Operations (D.O.D.O.) fight to stop the powerful witch Gráinne from using time travel to reverse the evolution of all modern technology. 

Chief amongst Gráinne’s plots: to encrypt cataclysmic spells into Shakespeare’s “cursed” play, Macbeth. When her fellow rogue agents fall victim to Gráinne’s schemes, Melisande Stokes is forced to send Tristan’s sister Robin back in time to 1606.While Robin poses as an apprentice in Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, Mel travels to the ancient Roman Empire and, with the help of double-agent Chira in Renaissance Florence, untangles the knotted threads of history while the diabolical Gráinne jumps from timeline to timeline, always staying frustratingly one stop ahead—or is it behind?

Review

I loved The Rise and Fall of DODO and was so excited to come across the sequel in my local bookshop. The book continues to be told via a mix of memos. journal entries, letters etc that continue to work well. It doesn’t matter if you haven’t read the first book, there is a handy summary at the start, in fact not reading the book first might not be such a bad thing but more on that later.

The Master of Revels in the title refers to Edmund Tilney, the person in charge of making sure plays are safe but who is unfortunately like Dr Blevins is under Grainne’s spell. So Robin, Tristian’s actress sister and self-confessed Shakespeare’s nerd has to travel back in time to stop Grainne altering Macbeth and killing Tristan all the while pretending to be a man. 

Robin is a fresh, new character and her adventures in Jacobean London form the main part of the story but luckily this is full of action and humour. Mel’s own time travel to the ancient Roman empire is equally hilarious.

I like the fact that the characters are honest enough to admit the original premise for the development of a time-travel agency was purely selfish(financial gain) and the rogue DODO are trying to change this. The consequences of the constant meddling in the past are now threatening to destroy technology in the future.

My favourite grumpy witch Eresebet continues to be grumpy and contradictory, and I love all of her interactions.

Now, for the parts, I didn’t like.

I loved the characters in the Rise and Fall of the DODO, their interactions with one another and how they build the agency was the heart of the story. So, it was so disappointing that Frank meets a grisly end at the start of the book ( not really a spoiler as it happens in the first few pages). Tristian has a brief chapter and then spends the rest of the book MIA. If I hadn’t been so invested in these characters from the first book it wouldn’t have made a difference- so not reading the first book may not be a bad thing. 

Would I recommend this book? Yes, -it still is an enjoyable story with lots of action, twists, and drama but if you plan on reading this book for Tristain and Frank- this may not be for you.

Perfect for fans

 Chaotic Time Travel stories like the Chronicles’ of St Mary

Content warning

Slavery, descriptions of sexual slavery and forced pregnancy.

The book ends on a cliff-hanger and I will read the next book. Hopefully, we will see more of Tristian!

5 thoughts on “Master of The Ravels by Nicole Galland- Book review

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